U.S Military Strategy in Afghanistan

Guest Host:

Katty Kay
In this photo taken Nov. 7, 2010, new Afghan police recruits practice shooting at a firing range on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan. Message to the Taliban: Forget July 2011, the date that President Barack Obama wants to begin withdrawing U.S. forces from Afghanistan. The more important date to watch is 2014 when the coalition hopes Afghan soldiers and policemen will be ready to take the lead in securing their nation.  - AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

In this photo taken Nov. 7, 2010, new Afghan police recruits practice shooting at a firing range on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan. Message to the Taliban: Forget July 2011, the date that President Barack Obama wants to begin withdrawing U.S. forces from Afghanistan. The more important date to watch is 2014 when the coalition hopes Afghan soldiers and policemen will be ready to take the lead in securing their nation.

AP Photo/Altaf Qadri

U.S Military Strategy in Afghanistan

The U.S. and NATO are considering plans this week to end their combat mission in Afghanistan by 2014. Possible elements of the proposal and the ongoing friction over U.S.-led attacks on Taliban insurgents.

President Obama will be in Lisbon Friday for a NATO summit. On the agenda: finalizing plans for ending U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan by 2014. President Obama faces political pressure on all sides of the issue. In the U.S. there are strong advocates for a speedier military withdrawal and also those who warn against setting public timetables. In addition, in Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai claims current U.S. military strategy which include night raids on Taliban militants is undermining overall Afghan support. Join us for a discussion of the future of the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan.

Guests

Ivo Daalder

U.S. Ambassador to NATO

Michael Semple

fellow, Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, Harvard University
former, deputy, EU Special Representative for Afghanistan

Yochi Dreazen

senior national security correspondent, National Journal magazine.

Michael O'Hanlon

senior fellow and director of research of the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution
co- author with Hassina Sherjan of "Toughing It Out in Afghanistan.”

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