DNA Sequencing & Personal Genomics

The first printout of the human genome to be presented as a series of books, displayed in the 'Medicine Now' room at the Wellcome Collection, London. The 3.4 billion units of DNA code are transcribed into more than a hundred volumes, each a thousand pages long, in type so small as to be barely legible. - Russ London via Wikimedia Commons

The first printout of the human genome to be presented as a series of books, displayed in the 'Medicine Now' room at the Wellcome Collection, London. The 3.4 billion units of DNA code are transcribed into more than a hundred volumes, each a thousand pages long, in type so small as to be barely legible.

DNA Sequencing & Personal Genomics

Growing access to personal genome sequencing.

Three years ago, it cost one million dollars to get your genome sequenced. Soon the price could drop to less than a thousand. What a personal genetic analysis can reveal – and whether it's too much information for an individual to handle.

Guests

Misha Angrist

the fourth subject in the Personal Genome Project, assistant professor at the Duke University Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, author of "Here is a Human Being: At the Dawn of Personal Genomics."

Kevin Davies

science writer, Editor-in-chief of "Bio-IT World" and the author of "The $1000 Genome: The Revolution in DNA Sequencing and the New Era of Personalized Medicine."

Arthur Caplan

professor of bioethics and philosophy, University of Pennsylvania

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