Thalidomide and the FDA

Frances Kathleen Oldham Kelsey receiving the President's Award for Distinguished Federal Civilian Service from President John F. Kennedy, in 1962 - National Institutes of Health

Frances Kathleen Oldham Kelsey receiving the President's Award for Distinguished Federal Civilian Service from President John F. Kennedy, in 1962

National Institutes of Health

Thalidomide and the FDA

Fifty years ago, a newly appointed medical officer at the FDA stood up to corporate pressure and refused to approve thalidomide, the drug already used for morning sickness in other parts of the world. The case transformed how Americans...

Fifty years ago, a newly appointed medical officer at the FDA stood up to corporate pressure and refused to approve thalidomide, the drug already used for morning sickness in other parts of the world. The case transformed how Americans think about medicine and the FDA's drug-testing policy. Diane and guests explore how thalidomide is being used today and discuss how Frances Kathleen Oldham Kelsey saved thousands of babies from the perils of thalidomide.

Guests

Gardiner Harris

science reporter for "The New York Times" and author of the mystery novel 'Hazard.'

Neil Vargesson

a developmental biologist and a lecturer Lecturer at the School of Medical Sciences of University of Aberdeen, in Scotland, studies thalidomide-induced limb malformations.

John Swann

Historian at the Food and Drug Administration

Dr. William Douglas Figg

Head of Molecular Pharmacology Section and Senior Scientist at the National Cancer Institute, studies the use of thalidomide in prostate cancer patients.

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