Oil-Eating Microbes and the BP Spill

Oil containment boom on the beach at Grand Isle, Louisiana on June 10, 2010 - Flickr user geauxlouisiana

Oil containment boom on the beach at Grand Isle, Louisiana on June 10, 2010

Flickr user geauxlouisiana

Oil-Eating Microbes and the BP Spill

A new study suggests mother nature might be cleaning up the BP spill faster than expected. Researchers found several species of oil-eating bacteria thriving in the submerged plume, but uncertainty remains over the threat to marine life.

A new study suggests mother nature might be cleaning up the BP spill faster than expected. Researchers found several species of oil-eating bacteria thriving in the submerged plume, but uncertainty remains over the threat to marine life.

Guests

Juliet Eilperin

Environmental reporter, Washington Post

Terry Hazen

Head of the Ecology Department and Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, the U.S. Department of Energy BER Distinguished Scientist, and the lead scientist on a new study of microbial activity in plumes of oil from the BP spill.

Richard Camilli

Associate Scientist of Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and chief scientist for a research team that first mapped the underwater plume.

Ronald Atlas

a microbiologist at the University of Louisville and past president of the American Society for Microbiology

David Guggenheim

president of 1planet1ocean, a project of The Ocean Foundation where he is a senior fellow

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