One of the world’s deadliest poisons is the key ingredient in the popular anti-aging drug, Botox. The emerging global black market for Botox and growing concerns the toxin in the drug could be used in a bioterrorism attack.

Guests

  • Kenneth Coleman a Senior Fellow, for the Chemical & Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Program (CBWNP) of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies
  • Dr. Tina Alster clinical professor of dermatology at Georgetown University Medical Center and the Director of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery.
  • Marina Voronova-Abrams biosecurity or biothreat reduction expert, formerly based in Central Asia and Russia, now works for the nonprofit environmental group Global Green
  • Col. Randall Larsen executive director of the bi-partisan, Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism and the founding director of The Institute for Homeland Security (2000-2003)

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