This Readers Review rebroadcast takes up one of the most beloved children’s books of all time. “Where the Wild Things Are” is the story of a naughty boy named Max who magically travels to a land of monsters and mayhem. Diane and her guests discuss why this classic has been banned from libraries while also inspiring books for adults, operas and a new movie.

Guests

  • Judith Rapoport a child psychologist and professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at George Washington University School of Medicine and author of "The Boy Who Couldn't Stop Washing."
  • Gregory Maguire author of the new book, "Making Mischief: A Maurice Sendak Appreciation," as well as "Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister," "Lost," and the Wicked Years, a series that became the basis for the Tony-award-winning musical "Wicked."
  • Leonard Marcus children's book historian, author, critic. His latest book, "Funny Business" will be published in October.

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