In two-thousand-five a son traveled to conflict-ridden Iraq, hoping to understand his father’s past as a Jew in Kurdistan. It’s the story of a disappearing way of life and an ancient language on the verge of extinction. It’s also a son’s story of reconciliation with his father

Guests

  • Yona Sabar Professor of Hebrew and Aramaic at UCLA's Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures.
  • Ariel Sabar Ariel Sabar is an award-winning former staff writer for "The Baltimore Sun" and the "Providence Journal."

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