After 100 years, Bhutan’s royal family has stepped aside to allow a peaceful and well-planned transition to democracy. A look at how the once isolated Himalayan nation, often romanticized as a living Shangri-la, is taking on modernity and political change.

Guests

  • William Frelick refugee policy director at Human Rights Watch
  • Preston Scott curator, Bhutan program of the 2008 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
  • Kinley Dorji founding editor of Bhutan's first national newspaper, "Kuensel"
  • Kunzang Choden writer; became Bhutan's first female novelist with the publication of "The Circle of Karma" in 2005; her latest book is "Chilli and Cheese: Food and Society in Bhutan."

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