Guest Host: Susan Page

The U.S. military is now sending teams of anthropologists and social scientists out to assist all combat brigades in Iraq and Afghanistan. The effort has reportedly helped troops improve relations with local populations and avert casualties, while raising a hearty debate among anthropologists over the ethical boundaries of their profession. A look at the so-called Human Terrain Teams and larger questions of how the military is adapting to new expectations in Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond.

Guests

  • David Rohde reporter, New York Times
  • Lt. Col. Edward Villacres military leader of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division Human Terrain Team
  • Col. John Agoglia director, U.S. Army Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute
  • David Price associate professor of anthropology and sociology at St. Martin's University; author of the forthcoming book, "Anthropological Intelligence: The Deployment and Neglect of American Anthropology in the Second World War."
  • Montgomery McFate senior social science adviser with the U.S. Army's Human Terrain System

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Friday News Roundup – International

Friday, Dec 19 2014World leaders react to a historic shift in U.S. policy toward Cuba. Pakistan buries victims of a school massacre by the Taliban. And U.S. officials say North Korea is behind the hacking of Sony Pictures. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

The Future Of U.S.-Cuban Relations

Thursday, Dec 18 2014Cuba releases American contractor Alan Gross after five years' imprisonment on espionage charges. The U.S. releases several Cubans in exchange. Details on the prisoner swap and the future of U.S.-Cuban relations.