Guest Host: Susan Page

The U.S. military is now sending teams of anthropologists and social scientists out to assist all combat brigades in Iraq and Afghanistan. The effort has reportedly helped troops improve relations with local populations and avert casualties, while raising a hearty debate among anthropologists over the ethical boundaries of their profession. A look at the so-called Human Terrain Teams and larger questions of how the military is adapting to new expectations in Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond.

Guests

  • David Rohde reporter, New York Times
  • Lt. Col. Edward Villacres military leader of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division Human Terrain Team
  • Col. John Agoglia director, U.S. Army Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute
  • David Price associate professor of anthropology and sociology at St. Martin's University; author of the forthcoming book, "Anthropological Intelligence: The Deployment and Neglect of American Anthropology in the Second World War."
  • Montgomery McFate senior social science adviser with the U.S. Army's Human Terrain System

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