Throughout human history diseases have spread from animals to people. Two scientists explain why, as the planet gets more crowded, we can expect more animal-transmitted diseases.


  • Robert Yolken, M.D. is the director of the Stanley Laboratory of Developmental Neurovirology and a professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He is the coeditor of the "Manual of Clinical Microbiology."
  • E. Fuller - duplicate record Torrey, M.D. is associate director for laboratory research at the Stanley Medical Research Institute in Bethesda, Maryland and author and coauthor of 18 books including "The Invisible Plague: The Rise of Mental Illness from 1750 to the Present."

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