Throughout human history diseases have spread from animals to people. Two scientists explain why, as the planet gets more crowded, we can expect more animal-transmitted diseases.

Guests

  • Robert Yolken, M.D. is the director of the Stanley Laboratory of Developmental Neurovirology and a professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He is the coeditor of the "Manual of Clinical Microbiology."
  • E. Fuller - duplicate record Torrey, M.D. is associate director for laboratory research at the Stanley Medical Research Institute in Bethesda, Maryland and author and coauthor of 18 books including "The Invisible Plague: The Rise of Mental Illness from 1750 to the Present."

Related Links

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

The Future Of U.S. Military Presence in Afghanistan

Wednesday, Mar 25 2015Nearly 10,000 U.S. military personnel remain in Afghanistan after combat forces withdrew last year. We explore a meeting between U.S. and Afghan officials this week, prospects for Congressional approval of additional troops and the future of security in the region.

Martha Hodes: “Mourning Lincoln”

Tuesday, Mar 24 2015Abraham Lincoln was the first American president to be assassinated. As the 150th anniversary of his death approaches, a historian explores how ordinary Americans mourned the loss of the 16th president.