The data from the 2000 census show a significant jump in the number of Hispanic people living in the U.S. A panel talks about this and other changes in the nation’s demographics, and what these changes mean for the economy, in politics, and in other arenas.

Guests

  • Dr. Francis Wardle executive director of the Center for the Study of Biracial Children and author of "Tomorrow's Children: Meeting the Needs of Multiracial and Multiethnic Children at Home, in Early Childhood Programs, and at School" (Center for the Study of Biracial Children)
  • William Spriggs director of research and public policy for the National Urban League
  • Jorge del Pinal assistant division chief in the Population Division of the Census Bureau
  • Cecilia Munoz vice president of policy for the National Council of La Raza

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