A panel of experts talks about the two presidential candidates’ views on the role of government: what vision each is articulating, and how consistent these ideas are with the parties’ traditional positions, plus what Americans want from their government.

Guests

  • Roger Wilkins professor of history and American culture at George Mason University
  • David Frum is a resident fellow, American Enterprise Institute; author of "Comeback: Conservatism That Can Win Again", and co-author of "An End to Evil: What's Next in the War on Terror;" former speechwriter and special assistant to President George W. Bush (2001-02).
  • David Gergen a professor of public service at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, editor-at-large for U.S. News & World Report, and a Senior Political Analyst for CNN. He served as a White House adviser to Presidents Nixon, Ford, Reagan, and Clinton.

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