Observers have been pleasantly surprised at the civility that prevailed during and since Sunday’s elections in Yugoslavia, but whether longtime President Slobodan Milosevic will allow a peaceful transition of leadership remains to be seen. A panel offers a thorough update on the news and talks about what could happen next.

Guests

  • Tom Gjelten correspondent, NPR, and author of 'Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba: The Biography of a Cause.'
  • Bratislav Grubacic editor-in-chief of VIP News Service in Belgrade
  • Sabrina Ramet professor of international studies at the University of Washington, and resident fellow, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
  • Warren Zimmerman professor of diplomacy at Columbia University and former U.S. Ambassador to Yugoslavia, 1989-1992

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