Sophisticated DNA techniques are increasingly being used to reopen long-settled criminal cases. Some officials oppose this practice, saying death row inmates and others are just putting off their rightful sentences. Others say that DNA evidence so often proves the person behind bars is in fact guilty that such tests should be standard. A panel talks about post-conviction DNA testing.

Guests

  • Mark Stolorow Cellmark Diagnostics
  • Jim Dwyer columnist for the New York Daily News and co-author of "Actual Innocence: Five Days to Execution and Other Dispatches from the Wrongly Convicted" (Doubleday)
  • Joshua Marquis District Attorney, Astoria Oregon also serves as a VP, National District Attorneys Association

Related Links

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Friday News Roundup – International

Friday, May 22 2015ISIS takes control of the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. Several nations agree to take in Southeast Asian migrants. And the U.S. and Cuba move closer to full restoration of diplomatic ties. A panel of journalists joins guest host Indira Lakshmanan for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

Friday News Roundup – Domestic

Friday, May 22 2015The NSA's bulk data collection faces a Friday deadline. A massive airbag recall could take years to complete. And the State Department makes plans to release the first batch of Hillary Clinton's emails. A panel of journalists joins guest host Indira Lakshmanan for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

Steve Inskeep: “Jacksonland”

Thursday, May 21 2015For years President Andrew Jackson was locked in a battle over Indian lands with a Cherokee chief. NPR’s Steve Inskeep on the history of that rivalry, how it led to the "Trail of Tears" and helped set the stage for the Civil War.