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This Sept. 29, 2009 photo shows U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Greg Rivers, 20, of Sylvester, Ga., holding his neck while waiting to take psychological tests at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, Calif. The U.S. government is testing hundreds of Marines and soldiers in search of clues that might help predict who is most susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder.

This Sept. 29, 2009 photo shows U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Greg Rivers, 20, of Sylvester, Ga., holding his neck while waiting to take psychological tests at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, Calif. The U.S. government is testing hundreds of Marines and soldiers in search of clues that might help predict who is most susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Monday, Dec 29 10 a.m. (ET)

Using Psychedelic Drugs To Treat Mental Disorders (Rebroadcast)

Psychedelic drugs like LSD and ecstasy have been considered dangerous and illicit for decades. But new medical research indicates these substances can help treat post-traumatic-stress disorder, addiction and depression. A discussion about the benefits and risks of psychedelic drug therapy.

Carlyle Group Co-Founder and Co-CEO David Rubenstein speaks during a session at the sixth annual Washington Ideas Forum, hosted by The Aspen Institute and the Atlantic, October 29, 2014 in Washington, D.C.

Carlyle Group Co-Founder and Co-CEO David Rubenstein speaks during a session at the sixth annual Washington Ideas Forum, hosted by The Aspen Institute and the Atlantic, October 29, 2014 in Washington, D.C.

Monday, Dec 29 11 a.m. (ET)

A Conversation with Financier and Philanthropist David Rubenstein (Rebroadcast)

David Rubenstein grew up working class in Baltimore. The founder of The Carlyle Group is now a billionaire - and one of the country's leading philanthropists. David Rubenstein on the role of private equity and what he calls "patriotic giving."

Most Recent
A women reads a book under the sun in the Luxembourg gardens in Paris, on July 1, 2010.

A women reads a book under the sun in the Luxembourg gardens in Paris, on July 1, 2010.

Friday, Dec 26 11 a.m. (ET)

A Special Readers’ Review: Why Fiction Matters (Rebroadcast)

A special March Readers' Review: Diane and her guests discuss why fiction matters. A recent study indicates that fewer than half of all Americans are reading novels today. It suggests that those who do read fiction are better able to understand the emotions of others. A conversation about the social and personal benefits of reading fiction.

Friday, Dec 26 10 a.m. (ET)

Matt Richtel: “A Deadly Wandering” (Rebroadcast)

A conversation with a Pulitzer-prize winning New York Times journalist on his book about one of the first known cases of a deadly car accident caused by someone who was texting while driving. In 2006, an ordinary Utah college student killed two rocket scientists while texting and driving along a highway bordering the Rocky Mountains. An examination of the case and an exploration of the latest scientific findings on the impact technology has on attention and focus.

Author Margaret Atwood attends the 18th Annual LA Times Festival Of Books at USC on April 20, 2013 in Los Angeles, California.

Author Margaret Atwood attends the 18th Annual LA Times Festival Of Books at USC on April 20, 2013 in Los Angeles, California.

Thursday, Dec 25 11 a.m. (ET)

Margaret Atwood: “Stone Mattress: Nine Tales” (Rebroadcast)

The author of "The Handmaid's Tale" and "The Blind Assassin" (winner of the 2000 Booker Prize) on her new collection of short fiction.

Musicians perform classical music at the 'Fifty Shades Of Grey' - The Classical Album Launch Event at Soho House on September 17, 2012 in New York City.

Musicians perform classical music at the 'Fifty Shades Of Grey' - The Classical Album Launch Event at Soho House on September 17, 2012 in New York City.

Thursday, Dec 25 10 a.m. (ET)

The Future of Classical Music (Rebroadcast)

A look at the current state of classical music in American culture, the financial health of its institutions, and new efforts to make it more accessible to millenials.

The trio rushes onstage, hand in hand. "We always came onstage this way, sometimes running right through the audience," the trio says.

The trio rushes onstage, hand in hand. "We always came onstage this way, sometimes running right through the audience," the trio says.

Wednesday, Dec 24 10 a.m. (ET)

Peter Yarrow and Noel Paul Stookey: “Peter, Paul and Mary: Fifty Years in Music and Life” (Rebroadcast)

In the early 1960s, Peter, Paul and Mary helped bring folk music out of the coffeehouses and onto the airwaves. Their songs of protest and struggle helped define a generation. In a new book, they look back on a career that spanned five decades.